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Guidelines Part 18 Contents

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

  G18.3 Interim Traffic Management Manual
  G18.4(1) Supervision - Traffic control person training in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC
  G18.4(2) Traffic control supervisor

TRAFFIC CONTROL PERSONS (TCPs)

  G18.8 Safe position for a traffic control person

EQUIPMENT FOR TRAFFIC CONTROL PERSONS

  G18.9 Colour of safety headgear for a traffic control person
  G18.9(a) Illuminated Traffic Control Paddles

Guidelines Part 18 - General requirements

G18.3  Interim Traffic Management Manual

Issued March 18, 2016

Regulatory excerpt
Section 4.4(2) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

When this Regulation requires a person to comply with

(a) a publication, code or standard of the Board or another agency, the person may, as an alternative, comply with another publication, code or standard acceptable to the Board, or

(b) practices, procedures or rules of the Board or another agency, the person may, as an alternative, comply with another practice, procedure or rule acceptable to the Board.

Section 18.3 of the Regulation states:

Traffic control equipment, arrangements and procedures must meet the requirements of the latest edition of the Traffic Control Manual for Work on Roadways (the "Traffic Control Manual") issued by the Ministry of Transportation, unless otherwise specified by this Regulation.

Purpose of guideline
This guideline explains which traffic control manual employers are required to follow.

Interim Traffic Management Manual
Section 18.3 requires employers to comply with the latest edition of the Ministry of Transportation's Traffic Control Manual for Work on Roadways. The latest edition of this manual was released in 1999 ("1999 Manual"). In early 2016, the Ministry of Transportation released the 2015 Interim Traffic Management Manual for Work on Roadways ("Interim Manual"). The Ministry intends to phase in the Interim Manual over the course of three years, with the Interim Manual replacing the 1999 Manual in 2019. Between 2016 and 2019, the Ministry will require some employers working on provincial roadways to use the Interim Manual instead of the 1999 Manual. Accordingly, between 2016 and 2019, some employers will follow the 1999 Manual while others will follow the Interim Manual.

Pursuant to section 4.4 of the Regulation, WorkSafeBC accepts the Interim Manual for the purposes of section 18.3 while the Interim Manual is being phased in. This means employers may decide to follow either the 1999 Manual or the Interim Manual at a particular workplace, but not both. WorkSafeBC prevention officers will expect employers to identify which manual they are following, and will inspect to that manual.

When the Interim Manual is implemented as the latest edition of the Traffic Control Manual, it will be mandatory for all workplaces in British Columbia, and the 1999 Manual will no longer be acceptable.

G18.4(1) Supervision - Traffic control person training in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC

Issued January 1, 2007; Editorial Revision May 3, 2007; Revised September 30, 2009; Editorial Revision March 7, 2011

Regulatory excerpt
Section 18.4(1) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

(1) The employer must ensure that whenever traffic control is required, all the following requirements are implemented:

...

(c) A person assigned to be a traffic control person is adequately trained in a manner acceptable to the Board and effectively performs their role in the traffic control arrangements and procedures for the work

Purpose of guideline
The purpose of this guideline is to outline what elements of training WorkSafeBC requires in different traffic control environments for a traffic control person to be considered trained in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC.

Discussion
Traffic control persons (TCPs) play an important role in protecting workers by helping to ensure road safety at worksites. The Regulation requirement for training of TCPs in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC under section 18.4 recognizes the important functions of the TCP, as well as the associated risks of injury to a TCP when controlling the direction, speed, and coordination of traffic at worksites.

The competencies a TCP requires is dependent on the circumstances the TCP is expected to face. Employers are expected to perform a job task analysis to determine the risks faced by the TCP. This job task analysis must consider the following:

  • Direction of traffic being controlled (two-way or one-way)
  • Traffic speed
  • Traffic volume
  • Duration of traffic control operation
  • Traffic control extending into dusk or night time hours
  • Sightline for oncoming traffic
  • Existence of overhead hazards
  • Whether traffic control will be performed in intersections
  • Other problematic elements such as active driveways, merging traffic, bus stops, and active mobile equipment

In all cases, traffic control work must be performed in a safe manner and in compliance with the Regulation. Sufficient supervision must be provided in the workplace to ensure training and instruction has been practicable and traffic control is being done effectively and safely.

WorkSafeBC considers the following training to be acceptable for high-risk, low/moderate risk, and emergency scene situations.

1. High-Risk Workplace TCPs
In high-risk situations, it is crucial that TCPs have the capability of controlling the risks they face and the skills to exercise independent judgement to ensure the integrity of the traffic control is maintained.

High-risk workplaces include those where TCPs are used to guide traffic through sections of a two-way road temporarily reduced to one lane, and where traffic must be stopped to permit work zone equipment to enter or cross a road.

In addition, high-risk workplaces will include those workplaces identified by the employer as high-risk following a job task analysis.

Subject matter required for training of TCPs in high-risk workplaces:
For TCPs working in high-risk workplaces, training must cover the following topics:

TCP training for high-risk situations must include in-class coursework as well as a practical component. The course should consist of at least two full days of instruction and assessment. TCP candidates must successfully complete a written test that assesses knowledge of the subject matter, and be evaluated on their practical competencies.

Delivery of training for TCPs in high-risk workplaces:
A comprehensive standardized traffic control training program that trains TCPs to an appropriate level of skill and knowledge for high-risk workplaces has been implemented by the B.C. Construction Safety Alliance. This training is being delivered through independent certified trainers and includes a database of qualified TCPs and proof-of-training cards.

Currently WorkSafeBC considers only the B.C. Construction Safety Alliance training to be training in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC under s. 18.4(1)(c) for TCPs working in high-risk workplaces. WorkSafeBC will review training courses for high-risk workplaces prepared and delivered by other agencies to ensure they constitute training in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC.

TCPs trained in a manner acceptable to WorkSafeBC for high-risk workplaces are deemed to have the requisite skills to work in other workplaces where TCPs are required.

It is important to note that it remains the employer's responsibility in all situations to instruct workers regarding specific risks at the workplace and to ensure the traffic control plan is adequate.

2. Low/Moderate Risk Workplace TCPs
In low/moderate-risk situations, the comprehensive TCP training for high-risk workplaces is not necessary. However, training must address the elements identified in the job task analysis. At a minimum this training must include

  • Overview of basic traffic control techniques, including setting up and taking down basic traffic control devices at a work site, proper hand signals, and proper positioning
  • Instruction on personal protective clothing and safety equipment
  • Responding to aggressive drivers
  • Identifying an escape route
  • Reporting of near misses and incidences that may occur

TCP training for low/moderate risk workplaces may include in-class coursework as well as a practical component, such as practice sessions in a controlled environment, and on-the-job training, where appropriate. Training may be delivered by the employer or by a third party. Training must be documented adequately. Training for high-risk TCPs is acceptable for low/moderate risk workplaces.

3. Emergency Scene Management
Emergency services' workers are often called upon to control traffic around the site of an emergency or accident.

In such situations it is expected that emergency services' workers would be trained in

  • Traffic control equipment
  • Equipment set up and take down
  • Principles of traffic management outlined in the Traffic Control Manual
  • Use of a buffer vehicle to protect the workplace
  • Other appropriate safe work procedures
  • Instruction on personal protective clothing and safety equipment

Where the traffic control situation will persist for longer than 2 hours, and it is necessary to direct traffic through sections of a two-way road temporarily reduced to one lane, it is expected that the emergency services' worker directing traffic would be trained in the manner of the high-risk TCP.

TCP training for emergency services' workplaces may include in-class coursework as well as a practical component, such as practice sessions in a controlled environment, and on-the-job training, where appropriate. Training may be delivered by the employer or by a third party. Training must be documented adequately.

Out-of-province high-risk workplace TCPs
TCPs who possess a certificate as required by a regulatory authority in another province or territory in Canada may not need to undergo further training, testing, or assessment. Applications to have an out-of-jurisdiction certificate recognized can be made to WorkSafeBC's Certification Services department at 604-276-3090.

G18.4(2) Traffic control supervisor

Issued February 27, 2001; Revised March 25, 2005, Editorial Revision January 1, 2007; Editorial Revision March 7, 2011

Regulatory excerpt
Section 18.4(2) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

The employer must ensure that during traffic control operations a supervisor is designated to ensure the requirements of subsection (1) (b) to (e) are met.

Purpose
This guideline addresses some common questions such as:

  • When is a traffic control supervisor required to be designated,
  • What may be the employment relationship between the traffic control supervisor and the employer(s) at the workplace,
  • What authority should the traffic control supervisor have in the workplace,
  • What qualifications should a traffic control supervisor have, and
  • Is the supervisor designated responsible for traffic control required to be at the workplace whenever traffic control is being used?

Supervisory designation
The Regulation requires a traffic control supervisor be designated whenever traffic control is being used. This includes situations where traffic control devices are being used without a traffic control person or persons. The purpose of section 18.4 is to ensure responsibility for supervision for traffic control operations is clearly established at the workplace.

The responsibility for designating the traffic control supervisor is with the employer if the workplace has workers from only one employer. If the workplace is a multi-employer workplace, the prime contractor has responsibilities under section 118 of the Workers Compensation Act ("Act"). The prime contractor would normally be expected to arrange or check for the designation of the traffic control supervisor as part of the prime contractor's responsibility to coordinate health and safety at the workplace. The traffic control supervisor need not be a worker of an employer at the workplace. The person so designated could, for example, be a consultant.

Authority
The person designated to be a supervisor of a traffic control operation will need sufficient authority, from the employer or prime contractor as applicable for the workplace, to effectively carry out the duties specified in section 18.4. The granting of authority would include ensuring all workers and other supervisory people in the workplace affected by the traffic control operation know the identity of the supervisor designated responsible for traffic control.

The person designated as traffic control supervisor must be able to effectively carry out the duties specified in section 18.4 of the Regulation, as well as those specified in section 117 of the Act. Under section 117, the supervisor must, among other things:

  • Ensure the health and safety of all workers under the direct supervision of the supervisor
  • Be knowledgeable about the provisions of the Act and regulations applicable to the work being supervised
  • Comply with the Act, regulations and any applicable orders, and ensure workers also comply
  • Ensure that workers under their direct supervision are made aware of all known or reasonably foreseeable health or safety hazards in their work area
  • Consult and cooperate with the joint committee or worker health and safety representative for the workplace

Knowledge and training
The traffic control supervisor needs to have knowledge of the applicable parts of the Regulation and the Traffic Control Manual (see section 18.3 of the Regulation) and the traffic management plan for the workplace. If the traffic management plan requires the use of traffic control persons (TCP), the designated supervisor should have a good knowledge of TCP training.

A supervisor who has taken the formal course of TCP instruction provided by the B.C. Construction Safety Alliance will have substantial knowledge of traffic control training and procedures, but such training, although recommended, is not a formal requirement. One of the additional benefits is that the supervisor who has TCP training can assume TCP duties where needed in the circumstances.

Presence at the worksite
The supervisor designated responsible for traffic control need not be present at the workplace at all times when traffic control is being used. However, the supervisor must be present as necessary to effectively carry out the duties specified above. This includes being reasonably available to respond to questions or to address changing conditions at the site. In a circumstance where a supervisor is not on site, contact by phone or similar means is sufficient if supervisory responsibilities and site issues can be effectively addressed by such means.

Guidelines Part 18 - Traffic control persons (TCPs)


G18.8 Safe position for a traffic control person

Issued April 21, 2016

Regulatory excerpt
Section 18.4 of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

(1) The employer must ensure that whenever traffic control is required, all of the following requirements are implemented:

(a) the traffic control arrangements and procedures for the work are made known to all the people involved in the work;

(b) the required traffic control devices and procedures are in place before the start of work and are removed when they are no longer required;

(c) any person assigned to be a traffic control person is adequately trained in a manner acceptable to the Board and effectively performs their role in the traffic control arrangements and procedures for the work;

(d) a traffic control person is positioned in a safe location clear of potential environmental hazards such as a slide or avalanche;

(e) if 2 or more traffic control persons are required to work as a team at the worksite, responsibility for coordination of changes in traffic flow is assigned.

(2) The employer must ensure that during traffic control operations a supervisor is designated to ensure the requirements of subsection (1)(b) to (e) are met.

Section 18.8 of the Regulation states:

A traffic control person must

(a) stand in a safe position, preferably on the driver's side of the lane under the TCP's control, be clearly visible, and have an unobstructed view of approaching traffic, and

(b) be positioned at least 25 m (80 ft) away from the work area unless circumstances or space requirements, such as working at or near an intersection, dictate otherwise.

Purpose of guideline
The purpose of this guideline is to discuss how to select the safe position for a traffic control person ("TCP") under sections 18.4 and 18.8 of the Regulation.

Safe position
When traffic control is required, the employer must ensure that the TCP is located in a safe position. This will involve identifying and assessing the potential risks associated with all site-specific conditions and hazards, and determining a safe position based on that assessment.

The safe position for a TCP will ordinarily be located either on the shoulder adjacent to the traffic being controlled or in a lane that has been closed to traffic on the same side of the roadway where the TCP is controlling traffic, provided that the closed lane is not the opposing lane, even when controlled by another TCP or device.

The TCP must be clearly visible by approaching drivers, while occupying in a position that does not expose the TCP to traffic hazards. To achieve that, the TCP will stand where the background will make them as conspicuous as possible, away from other workers, and not in a group of people. Selecting a safe position will also entail ensuring that the TCP has an escape route — an unobstructed path for avoiding errant vehicles and equipment.

Standing on the driver's side
Section 18.8 specifies that it may be preferable to stand on the driver's side of the lane under the TCP's control. This position is only preferable if it is a position that is safe for the TCP from traffic and other hazards. Typically this will be after more than one vehicle has been stopped from a safe position (such as the shoulder) and it is necessary to move into that lane to assess queue length or to achieve a better view of approaching vehicles, and the TCP should then return to the starting position before directing the traffic to proceed. TCPs should not be positioned on the driver's side of the lane if the TCP will be exposed to traffic in the adjoining lane, as the presence of traffic will result in that position not being safe.

Guidelines Part 18 - Equipment for traffic control persons

G18.9 Safety headgear for traffic control persons

Issued February 27, 2001; Editorial Revision January 1, 2007; Revised September 28, 2007

Regulatory excerpt
Section 18.9 of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

Each traffic control person must be provided with, and must use, all of the following:
(d) safety headgear of a high visibility colour with a strip of retroreflective tape across the top from front to back and on the sides;

Background

Section 18.9 was added to the Regulation in 2007. The requirement to provide and use a high visibility colour for safety headgear for traffic control persons under Part 18 allows for a choice of a high visibility colour. Acceptable colours for safety headgear under Part 18 are provided in this guideline.

Description

The CSA Standard Z96-02, High-Visibility Safety Apparel, and WCB Standard: PPE 2 High Visibility Garment - Personal Protective Equipment Standard 2, provide acceptable high visibility colours for safety garments as fluorescent yellow-green, fluorescent orange-red and fluorescent red. These colours are acceptable for safety headgear provided to, and used by, traffic control persons under Part 18 of the Regulation. High visibility colours of equivalent luminance quality, as well as the orange colour specified in the Traffic Control Manual for Work on Roadways issued by the Ministry of Transportation, are also acceptable colours for traffic control persons' safety headgear.

The retroflective tape strip on the safety headgear is to meet the specifications for VE Trim as set out in WCB Standard: PPE 2 High Visibility Garment - Personal Protective Equipment Standard 2.

G18.9(a) - Illuminated Traffic Control Paddles

Issued February 27, 2012

Regulatory excerpt
Section 18.9 of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states, in part:

Each traffic control person must be provided with, and must use, all of the following:

(a) a traffic control paddle meeting the requirements for a C-27H Traffic Control Paddle as specified in the Traffic Control Manual and, if necessary to control fatigue, a non-conductive support staff for the paddle;

Purpose of guideline
The purpose of this guideline is to clarify the acceptability of using illuminated traffic control paddles (TCPs) in traffic control operations.

Illuminated traffic control paddles
Recent developments in technology have allowed for the placement of lights (typically LEDs) along the outside edge of TCPs, providing illumination to the sign in an effort to increase visibility of the sign, and consequently of the traffic control person and other workers.

One such design provides a ring of eight red LEDs around the perimeter of the red "Stop" side of the sign, and a similar configuration on the yellow "Slow" side of the sign. While LED lighting is not considered in the Traffic Control Manual (as defined in section 18.3 of the Regulation), such a configuration is referenced as acceptable in the U.S. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). LEDs arranged on a sign in this fashion can be an enhancement to visibility and safety.

They may be used if all other requirements specified in the Traffic Control Manual are met and followed; providing that the visibility and effectiveness of the TCP is in no way reduced or compromised.

Disclaimer: The Workers' Compensation Board of B.C. ("WorkSafeBC") publishes the online version Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHS Regulation") in accordance with its mandate under the Workers Compensation Act to provide information and promote public awareness of occupational health and safety matters. The online OHS Regulation is not the official version of the OHS Regulation, which may be purchased from Crown Publications. WorkSafeBC endeavours to update the online OHS Regulation as soon as possible following any legislative amendments. However, WorkSafeBC does not warrant the accuracy or the completeness of the online OHS Regulation, and neither WorkSafeBC nor its board of directors, employees or agents shall be liable to any person for any loss or damage of any nature, whether arising out of negligence or otherwise, arising from the use of the online OHS Regulation. Employers are legally obligated to make a copy of the Workers Compensation Act and the OHS Regulation readily available for review by workers. The circumstances under which WorkSafeBC may consider an employer's providing access to electronic versions of the Act and OHS Regulation to have satisfied this obligation are described in Guideline G-D3-115(2)(f).