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Policies Part 8 Contents

RESPIRATORS

R8.33-1 RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - Respirators - Interchanging Air Cylinders
R8.33-2 RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - Respirators - Interchanging Air Lines

Policies Part 8 - General Requirements

Policy Item R8.10-1
RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - General Requirements - Personal Clothing and Accessories
BACKGROUND

1. Explanatory Notes
Section 8.10 sets out restrictions on personal clothing and accessories and on cranial and facial hair to avoid the creation of hazards.

2. The Regulation

Section 8.10:

(1) The personal clothing of a worker must be of a type and in a condition which will not expose the worker to any unnecessary or avoidable hazards.

(2) If there is a danger of contact with moving parts of machinery or with electrically energized equipment, or if the work process presents similar hazards

(a) the clothing of the worker must fit closely about the body,

(b) dangling neckwear, bracelets, wristwatches, rings or similar articles must not be worn, except for medical alert bracelets which may be worn with transparent bands that hold the bracelets snugly to the skin, and

(c) cranial and facial hair must be confined, or worn at a length which will prevent it from being snagged or caught in the work process.

POLICY

The Board is only concerned with the lack of clothing if a worker is exposed to the possibility of injury from the material being handled or contact with an abrasive surface or object, or contact with a surface at a temperature which could cause a burn injury.

Workers handling hot tar or other material that could burn through splashing, fuming, or radiant heat must wear suitable clothing covering the body and arms.

Workers exposed to the abrasive action of material, such as the carrying of lumber on the shoulder or against the body, must wear appropriate clothing.

A worker may have to change or add clothing as the worker's job duties or work conditions change.

The employer may have a dress code or policy for clothing requirements during warm weather. An officer will not enforce an employer's policy of this type.

Officers will issue orders where the lack of clothing is exposing a worker to the possibility of injury.


EFFECTIVE DATE: April 1, 2001
AUTHORITY: s. 8.10, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
CROSS REFERENCES: s. 8.2, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
HISTORY: Housekeeping changes effective September 15, 2010 to delete practice reference and make formatting changes.
Replaces Policy No. 14.02 of the Prevention Division Policy and Procedure Manual
APPLICATION: This Item results from the 2000/2001 "editorial" consolidation of all prevention policies into the Prevention Manual. The POLICY in this Item merely continues the substantive requirements of Policy No. 14.02, as they existed prior to the Effective Date, with any wording changes necessary to reflect legislative and regulatory changes since Policy No. 14.02 was issued.

Policies Part 8 - Footwear

Policy Item R8.22-1
RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - Footwear - General Requirement
BACKGROUND

1. Explanatory Notes
Section 8.22 sets out the general requirements for protective footwear, including the standards with which safety protective footwear must comply.

2. The Regulation
Section 8.22:

(1) A worker's footwear must be of a design, construction, and material appropriate to the protection required.

(2) To determine appropriate protection under subsection (1) the following factors must be considered: slipping, uneven terrain, abrasion, ankle protection and foot support, crushing potential, temperature extremes, corrosive substances, puncture hazards, electrical shock and any other recognizable hazard.

(3) If a determination has been made that safety protective footwear is required to have toe protection, metatarsal protection, puncture resistant soles, dielectric protection or any combination of these, the footwear must meet the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z195-M92, Protective Footwear

(b) ANSI Standard Z41-1991, American National Standard for Personal Protection - Protective Footwear,

(c) British Safety Institution Standard BS EN 345:1993 Specification for Safety Footwear for Professional Use, or

(d) British Safety Institution Standard BS EN 346:1993 Specification for Protective Footwear for Professional Use.

(4) A worker must wear the appropriate footwear and ensure that it is in a condition to provide the required protection.

(5) If it is not practicable for workers in the performing arts to wear safety footwear meeting the requirements of subsection (3) other effective measures must be taken for protection from injury.

POLICY

Where the worker's job activity or work environment has a danger of injury to the toes, metatarsal area, or soles of the feet, the footwear must incorporate devices to protect against the danger. The dangers can be tools, materials or equipment dropping or rolling onto the toes or top of the foot, or stepping on sharp objects which can cut or puncture the sole of the foot. If one or more of these dangers are present, workers must wear footwear with the necessary protective features meeting the requirements of a standard authorized under section 8.22(3). If the footwear does not have the protective features, the alternative of using footguards or other effective devices is acceptable.

There are job activities and work environments where, although the dangers of injury to the worker do not require the specific protective footwear meeting the requirements of section 8.22(3), appropriate footwear must be worn to prevent injury to the worker. Other dangers against which protection is required include slipping, dampness, heat, cold, uneven ground or work surfaces that could twist the ankle, harmful materials that could contact the skin of the foot, ankle or lower leg, abrasion or hits to the ankle.

The standards in section 8.22(3) do not provide performance requirements to guide the selection or assessment of footwear for protection from these dangers. The employer must assess each worker's exposure to the dangers and ensure the worker's footwear is of a type and construction which minimizes, as far as is practicable, the risk of injury to the worker.

Athletic shoes provide a considerable degree of comfort and support to the foot in strenuous sports activities such as running, or court games like tennis or squash. This footwear is acceptable for occupational use provided the style and construction provides protection from the dangers to which the worker will be exposed. As illustrations:

  • Mesh-type covering over the toe area would not be acceptable in a laboratory where there is danger of chemicals dropping onto the foot.
  • Low cut uppers would not be acceptable where there is danger of abrasion to the ankle.

There are job activities and work environments where a heavy work shoe or boot or a specific protective feature would normally be required but the wearing of such footwear could endanger the worker or damage the work environment. The Board accepts the following:

  • Roofers applying asphalt shingles or similar materials which can be damaged by heavy work boots generally wear light, soft-soled footwear.
  • Carpet layers and similar finishing trades where workers are constantly kneeling down generally do not use safety-toed footwear.
  • When workers are climbing or walking steel, safety-toed footwear is not required. However, they must wear substantial footwear having leather uppers reaching past the ankle.
  • Workers in the logging industry walking on logs or on steep sidehills or uneven ground are not required to have safety-toes in their footwear.

Occasionally the Board receives a request under Division 9 of the Act to vary the application of section 8.22 for medical reasons. The Board will consider such a request if the concern is based on a medical reason and:

  • there is no alternative means of modifying the work requirements or the work area in order to remove the risk of injury;
  • the risk of injury is comparatively minor; and
  • the medical reason is valid.


EFFECTIVE DATE: April 1, 2001
AUTHORITY: s. 8.22, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
CROSS REFERENCES: Division 9, Workers Compensation Act
HISTORY: Housekeeping changes effective September 15, 2010 to delete practice reference and make formatting changes.
Housekeeping changes were made on March 1, 2005 to reflect the October 29, 2003 changes to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHSR"). This Item originally replaced Policy No. 14.08 of the former Prevention Division Policy and Procedure Manual.
Effective October 29, 2003, the reproduction of section 8.22(3)(e) of the OHSR in this Item was deleted to reflect its repeal.
A housekeeping change was made on December 14, 2001.
This Item results from the 2000/2001 "editorial" consolidation of all prevention policies into the Prevention Manual. The POLICY in this Item merely continues the substantive requirements of Policy No. 14.08, as they existed prior to the Effective Date, with any wording changes necessary to reflect legislative and regulatory changes since Policy No. 14.08 was issued.
APPLICATION: This policy applies to worker footwear on and after April 1, 2001.

Policies Part 8 - Respirators

Policy Item R8.33-1 RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - Respirators - Interchanging Air Cylinders

BACKGROUND
1. Explanatory Notes
Section 8.33 outlines the general requirements for the selection of respiratory protective equipment.

2. The Regulation
Section 8.33:

(1) The employer, in consultation with the worker and the occupational health and safety committee, if any, or the worker health and safety representative, if any, must select an appropriate respirator in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-93, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

(2) Only a respirator which meets the requirements of a standard acceptable to the Board may be used for protection against airborne contaminants in the workplace.

POLICY
Compressed air cylinders may be interchanged with different makes of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) provided the cylinders are fully compatible with the SCBA on which they will be used. The cylinders must have the same pressure rating and fittings with the same type of thread and thread length.

When interchanging is being done, the user should be aware that using cylinders originally made for one make of SCBA on another make will void the NIOSH approval for that SCBA. This may affect the user's ability to successfully recover damages from the SCBA manufacturer in the event of an equipment problem or malfunction.


EFFECTIVE DATE: August 1, 2001
AUTHORITY: s. 8.33, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
CROSS REFERENCES:
HISTORY: Housekeeping changes effective February 1, 2011 to reflect regulation changes effective on that date.
Housekeeping changes effective September 15, 2010 to delete practice reference and make formatting changes.
Housekeeping changes were made on March 1, 2005 to reflect the October 29, 2003 changes to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHSR"). This Item originally replaced Policy No. 14.23(2)-1 of the former Prevention Division Policy and Procedure Manual.
Effective October 29, 2003, the reproduction of section 8.33(1) of the OHSR in this Item was revised to reflect its amendment.
This Item results from the 2000/2001 "editorial" consolidation of all prevention policies into the Prevention Manual. The POLICY in this Item merely continues the substantive requirements of Policy No. 14.23(2)-1, as they existed prior to the Effective Date, with any wording changes necessary to reflect legislative and regulatory changes since Policy No. 14.23(2)-1 was issued.
APPLICATION: This policy applies to interchanging compressed air cylinders on self-contained breathing apparatus on and after August 1, 2001.

Policy Item R8.33-2
RE: Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment - Respirators - Interchanging Air Lines

BACKGROUND
1. Explanatory Notes
Section 8.33 outlines the general requirements for the selection of respiratory protective equipment.

2. The Regulation
Section 8.33:

(1) The employer, in consultation with the worker and the occupational health and safety committee, if any, or the worker health and safety representative, if any, must select an appropriate respirator in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-93, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

(2) Only a respirator which meets the requirements of a standard acceptable to the Board may be used for protection against airborne contaminants in the workplace.

POLICY
Air lines on respirators can generally be interchanged provided they:

  • are NIOSH approved;
  • are of the same inside diameter and length as recommended by the manufacturer; and
  • have compatible end fittings.

When interchanging is being done, the user should be aware that using air lines originally made for one make of respirator on another make will void the NIOSH approval for that respirator. This may affect the user's ability to successfully recover damages from the respirator manufacturer in the event of an equipment problem or malfunction.


EFFECTIVE DATE: August 1, 2001
AUTHORITY: s. 8.33, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
CROSS REFERENCES:
HISTORY: Housekeeping changes effective February 1, 2011 to reflect regulation changes effective on that date.
Housekeeping changes effective September 15, 2010 to delete practice reference and make formatting changes.
Housekeeping changes were made on March 1, 2005 to reflect the October 29, 2003 changes to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHSR"). This Item originally replaced Policy No. 14.23(2)-2 of the former Prevention Division Policy and Procedure Manual.
Effective October 29, 2003, the reproduction of section 8.33(1) of the OHSR in this Item was revised to reflect its amendment.
This Item results from the 2000/2001 "editorial" consolidation of all prevention policies into the Prevention Manual. The POLICY in this Item merely continues the substantive requirements of Policy No. 14.23(2)-2, as they existed prior to the Effective Date, with any wording changes necessary to reflect legislative and regulatory changes since Policy No. 14.23(2)-2 was issued. A caution has been added regarding the voiding of NIOSH approval in certain situations.
APPLICATION: This policy applies to interchanging air lines on respirators on and after August 1, 2001.

Disclaimer: The Workers' Compensation Board of B.C. ("WorkSafeBC") publishes the online version Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHS Regulation") in accordance with its mandate under the Workers Compensation Act to provide information and promote public awareness of occupational health and safety matters. The online OHS Regulation is not the official version of the OHS Regulation, which may be purchased from Crown Publications. WorkSafeBC endeavours to update the online OHS Regulation as soon as possible following any legislative amendments. However, WorkSafeBC does not warrant the accuracy or the completeness of the online OHS Regulation, and neither WorkSafeBC nor its board of directors, employees or agents shall be liable to any person for any loss or damage of any nature, whether arising out of negligence or otherwise, arising from the use of the online OHS Regulation. Employers are legally obligated to make a copy of the Workers Compensation Act and the OHS Regulation readily available for review by workers. The circumstances under which WorkSafeBC may consider an employer's providing access to electronic versions of the Act and OHS Regulation to have satisfied this obligation are described in Guideline G-D3-115(2)(f).