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Part 26 Contents

26.1 Definitions

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

26.1.1 Prime contractor requirements for forestry operations
26.1.2 Multiple-employer workplace
26.2 Planning and conducting a forestry operation
26.3 Training
26.3.1 Forestry operation fire fighting
26.4 Notice of project
26.5 Initial safety meeting
26.6 Working alone [Repealed]
26.7 Highly visible clothing
26.7.1 Climbing equipment
26.7.2 Weather conditions
26.8 Cutting cables
26.9 Chainsaw training [Repealed]
26.10 Metal in saw logs
26.11 Dangerous trees
26.12 Vehicle load limits [Repealed]

EQUIPMENT OPERATION

26.12.1 Equipment capabilities
26.12.2 Radio controlled equipment
26.13 Non-slip floors and controls
26.13.1 Equipment operator protections
26.13.2 Maintaining operator vision
26.13.3 Mobile yarders
26.13.4 Saw chain shot
26.14 Equipment clearance [Repealed]
26.14.1 Hazard area of logging equipment
26.14.2 Designated safe work area
26.14.3 Traffic control
26.15 Log pile heights [Repealed]
26.16 Slope limitations
26.17 Weather conditions [Repealed]
26.18 Landslides
26.19 Forest fire fighting [Repealed]
26.20 Night operations [Repealed]

MANUAL FALLING AND BUCKING

26.20.1 Application
26.21 Faller qualifications
26.22 Forestry operation faller training
26.22.1 Falling supervisors for forestry operations
26.23 Procedures for falling and bucking
26.24 Responsibility for falling and bucking
26.25 Dangerous trees and logs
26.26 Falling dangerous trees
26.27 Location of fallers
26.28 Summoning assistance
26.29 Entry to falling area

MECHANICAL FALLING

26.29.1 Application
26.29.2 Limits on use of mechanical harvester
26.29.3 Incomplete falling cuts
26.29.4 Hazard area
26.29.5 No additional hazards

TRAFFIC CONTROL FOR FALLING OPERATIONS

26.30 Traffic control

YARDING

26.31 Equipment construction [Repealed]
26.32 Operator protection [Repealed]
26.33 Mobile yarders [Repealed]
26.33.1 Application
26.34 Signalling
26.35 Radio controlled machines [Repealed]
26.36 Climbing equipment [Repealed]
26.37 Hoisting workers [Repealed]
26.38 Riding on rigging
26.39 Safe location
26.39.1 Removal of potential hazards to rigging
26.40 Anchors
26.41 Guylines
Figure 26-1 Positioning guylines for mobile yarders [Repealed]
26.42 Rigging
26.43 Supporting blocks
26.44 Winches
26.45 Prohibition of knots
26.46 Skyline anchors
26.47 Skyline extensions
26.48 Skyline spars
26.49 Skyline rigging
26.50 Backspar guylines
26.51 Lift trees
26.52 Corridor logging [Repealed]

SKIDDING

26.53 Ground skidding operations
26.54 Equipment stability [Repealed]
26.55 Mainline release

FORESTRY WORK AREAS

26.56 Work area arrangement
26.57 Equipment locations [Repealed]
26.58 Limbing and bucking restrictions [Repealed]
26.59 Suspended logs
26.60 Log handling equipment [Repealed]
26.61 Vehicle movements
26.62 Maintenance [Repealed]
26.63 Unauthorized persons
26.64 Bunk and stake assemblies

HAULING

26.65 Cab guard
26.66 Bunks and stakes
26.67 Load specifications
26.68 Binders
26.69 Binder removal
26.70 Unguarded equipment [Repealed]
26.71 Operating provisions [Repealed]
26.71.1 Operating procedures
26.71.2 Daily log
26.72 Warning devices
26.73 Non-slip steps [Repealed]
26.74 Restriction [Repealed]
26.75 Riders [Repealed]
26.76 Securing trailers
26.77 Assistance on steep grades
26.78 Transporting workers

ROADS AND ROAD MAINTENANCE

26.79 Haul road standards
26.80 Creating additional hazards
26.81 Bull rails
26.82 Roadside hazards
26.83 Traffic control systems
26.83.1 Radio traffic control
26.84 Weigh scales

WATER OPERATIONS

26.85 Condition of boats
26.86 Boat equipment
26.87 Boat size
26.88 Overloading
26.89 Presence of operator
26.90 Wind and sea conditions
26.91 Hand signals
26.92 Elevated work platforms [Repealed]
26.93 General requirements for booming
26.94 Rigging
26.95 Winches
26.96 Manual boom stripping
26.97 Portable augers [Repealed]
26.98 Dumping log bundles
26.99 Rescue [Repealed]
Table 26-1: Audible call signals
Table 26-2: Audible signals for vehicle operations
Table 26-3: Audible signals for high lead logging
Table 26-4: Audible signals for slackline logging
Table 26-5: Audible signals for mechanical slack pulling and drop line carriages on skyline yarders or running skyline yarders (as applicable)
Table 26-6: Requirements for radio controlled carriages
Table 26-7: Hand signals
A Cable logging
B Skidding
Table 26-8: Voice commands for grapple yarders

Forestry Operations and Similar Activities Definitions

26.1 Definitions

In this Part

"active falling area" means the area within a 2 tree length radius of where a faller or mechanized falling equipment is located and equipped so as to be able to fall timber;

"backspar" means a tree rigged up at the back end of a work area to support a skyline;

"binder" means a wire, synthetic rope, chain or other device that is secured by a cinch and placed around logs on a logging truck or trailer to prevent the logs from spilling;

"bucker" means a worker who cuts up trees on the ground;

"bunk" means the bottom section of the cradle assembly on a logging truck or trailer onto which logs are placed;

"butt rigging" means a system of swivels, shackles, links and hooks which connect the haulback and mainlines and to which chokers are fastened;

"cable logging" means a yarding system employing winches, blocks and cables;

"dangerous tree" means a tree that is a hazard to a worker due to

(a) its location or lean,

(b) its physical damage,

(c) overhead conditions,

(d) deterioration of its limbs, stem or root system, or

(e) any combination of the conditions in paragraphs (a) to (d);

"faller" means a worker who manually falls trees;

"forestry operation" means a workplace where work is done in relation to silviculture or harvesting trees, including constructing the means of access and transporting the harvested trees to a facility where they are processed or from which they are exported;

"haulback" means the cable used to outhaul the rigging or grapple when yarding;

"high lead" means a cable logging system in which running line lead blocks are placed on a lift tree or on a mobile yarder to provide lift to the logs during yarding;

"holding wood" means the hinge of wood left uncut between the back of the undercut and the backcut;

"intermediate spar" means a tree used to elevate a skyline between the yarder and the backspar in a multispan skyline system;

"landing" means the area to which logs are

(a) yarded or skidded for sorting, and

(b) prepared for transportation;

"lift tree" means a tree rigged to support running lines;

"log transporter" means any of the following used to transport logs on roads:

(a) a truck;

(b) a trailer;

(c) a truck and trailer assembly;

"mainline" means the cable used to yard logs;

"mobile equipment" means mobile equipment as defined in section 16.1;

"mobile yarder" means a logging machine mounted on wheels, tracks or skids, incorporating a vertical or inclined spar, tower or boom used in a skyline, slackline, modified slackline, high lead, or grapple cable logging system;

"molly hogan" means a single strand of wire rope rolled into a circle with 6 complete wraps that may be used as a temporary method of connecting the eye splices of 2 lines of the same size or in pin shackles to replace the cotter pin;

"multiple-employer workplace" has the same meaning as in section 118 of the Workers Compensation Act;

"prime contractor" has the same meaning as in section 118 of the Workers Compensation Act;

"sapling" means an immature tree that ordinarily would not be harvested;

"skidding" means moving logs by the use of mobile equipment that travels while the logs are being dragged;

"skyline" means a cable on a yarder that supplies lift for yarding lines, blocks, rigging, carriage and logs;

"slackline" means a skyline that can be tensioned at the operator's discretion;

"spar" means a tree or mast on which rigging is hung for a cable logging system;

"strawline" means a small diameter cable used in rigging up or moving larger cables or blocks;

"turn" means one or more logs that are skidded or yarded to the landing at one time;

"yarding" means moving logs by the use of mobile or other equipment that does not travel while the logs are being moved.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.]

General Requirements

26.1.1 Prime contractor requirements for forestry operations

If the owner of a forestry operation enters into an agreement referred to in section 118 (1) of the Act designating a person to be the prime contractor for a workplace, the owner must ensure that

(a) the person designated

(i) is qualified to be the prime contractor in respect of that workplace, and

(ii) has the authority necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of prime contractor under the Act, including, without limitation, authority over any employer, worker or other person who may be carrying out the work of the owner at the workplace, and

(b) not more than one person holds the designation of prime contractor for that workplace at any given time.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.1.2 Multiple-employer workplace

(1) This section applies to a multiple-employer workplace in a forestry operation.

(2) Before starting any activity that is likely to create a hazard for an independent operator or a worker of another employer, the person intending to carry out the activity must notify the prime contractor.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.2 Planning and conducting a forestry operation

(1) The owner of a forestry operation must ensure that all activities of the forestry operation are both planned and conducted in a manner consistent with this Regulation and with safe work practices acceptable to the Board.

(2) Every person who has knowledge and control of any particular activity in a forestry operation must ensure that the activity is both planned and conducted in a manner consistent with this Regulation and with safe work practices acceptable to the Board.

(3) The planning required under this section must

(a) include identification of any work activities or conditions at the workplace where there is a known or reasonably foreseeable risk to workers,

(b) be completed before work commences on the relevant activity, and

(c) be documented at the time of planning.

(4) If, after any planning referred to in subsection (3), there is a change in the workplace circumstances, including the work activities and the conditions of the workplace, and the change poses or creates a known or reasonably foreseeable risk to workers that was not previously identified, then

(a) the plan must be amended to identify and address the risk and provide for the health and safety of the workers at the workplace, and

(b) the amendment must be documented as soon as is practicable.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.3 Training

(1) Every worker in a forestry operation must receive the training necessary to safely perform the worker's duties.

(2) The requirements of subsection (1) are deemed to have been met with regard to duties of a type performed before April 15, 1998 if

(a) the worker performed the duties regularly for at least 2 years prior to that date, and

(b) the duties performed were documented by April 15, 1999.

(3) Records must be kept, in a form and manner acceptable to the Board, of the training provided in subsection (1).

(4) On request of a worker, a copy of the records under subsection (3) that pertain to the worker must be provided to the worker.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.3.1 Forestry operation fire fighting

(1) Workers in a forestry operation who fight a forest fire must be

(a) trained in their fire fighting duties in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board, and

(b) physically capable of performing their duties safely and effectively.

(2) Training must be provided annually to every worker who is required to fight forest fires and records must be kept of the training provided to each worker.

(3) Except under emergency conditions, a worker who is fighting a forest fire must wear

(a) long pants and a long sleeved shirt made of cotton, wool, denim or flame resistant material, or

(b) other protective clothing appropriate to the hazards to which the worker may be exposed.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.4 Notice of project

(1) This section

(a) applies to a workplace in a forestry operation where the work is expected to last more than 5 working days, but

(b) does not apply where the work is limited to

(i) timber cruising,

(ii) forestry road or cutblock layout, or

(iii) surveying.

(2) Not more than 30 days and not fewer than 24 hours before the start of work at a workplace, the owner for whom the work is being done must ensure that a notice of project is provided to the nearest Board office.

(3) If it is necessary to do immediate work in order to prevent injury to workers or damage to property, work on the project may commence immediately, and the owner for whom the work is being done must ensure that a notice of project is provided to the nearest Board office at the earliest possible time.

(4) A notice of project under subsection (2) or (3) must be provided in a form and manner acceptable to the Board.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.5 Initial safety meeting

(1) In this section, "new work location" means a work location in a forestry operation where the crew of workers has not previously worked.

(2) Before a crew of workers starts work in a new work location, a crew safety meeting must be held to inform the workers of any known or reasonably foreseeable risks in that location and the actions to be taken to eliminate or minimize those risks.

(3) If a worker did not attend the crew safety meeting under subsection (2) for a new work location, before starting work in that location, the worker must receive a safety orientation that covers any known or reasonably foreseeable risks in that location and the actions taken to eliminate or minimize those risks.

(4) Records must be kept of the crew safety meetings and safety orientations provided under subsections (2) and (3).

26.6 Working alone

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.7 Highly visible clothing

(1) Highly visible outer clothing that meets the requirements of Part 8 must be worn by a worker in a forestry operation if

(a) the worker may be endangered by any moving equipment or line,

(b) the worker's location must be routinely checked, or

(c) the worker is involved in harvesting trees at night.

(2) Safety headgear worn by a worker in a forestry operation must be a high visibility colour that contrasts with the background against which the worker is working.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.7.1 Climbing equipment

(1) In this section, "climber" means a worker who climbs trees or wooden spars at the workplace.

(2) Unless a climber uses other equipment acceptable to the Board, a climber must use

(a) a safety belt,

(b) a climbing rope or strap, and

(c) climbing spurs.

(3) If a climber must disconnect the climbing rope or strap in order to move by an obstacle, the climber must use a second climbing rope or strap to ensure continuous protection while passing the obstacle.

(4) Before a climber begins a climbing activity, a written climber rescue plan must be developed and communicated to all persons associated with the climbing activity.

(5) If a climber rescue plan requires another climber,

(a) a duplicate set of climbing equipment must be available for immediate use at the climbing work site, and

(b) the other climber must be available to carry out any required rescue.

(6) If there is a possibility of a climbing rope or strap being severed in the conditions present at a climbing work site, then

(a) the rope or strap must be made of material that cannot be severed, or

(b) the climber must use a second climbing rope or strap.

(7) Climbing equipment must be maintained in good order.

(8) A climber must inspect the climbing equipment before each use to ensure it is in good order.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.7.2 Weather conditions

When weather conditions create a hazard for a worker in a forestry operation, additional precautions must be taken as necessary for the safe conduct of the work.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.8 Cutting cables

A hammer or axe must not be used to cut wire rope, unless designed for that purpose.

26.9 Chainsaw training

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

26.10 Metal in saw logs

A spike, drift bolt, nail, or any other metal must not be left in any recoverable log.

26.11 Dangerous trees

(1) If it is known or reasonably foreseeable that work will expose a worker to a dangerous tree,

(a) the tree must be felled, or

(b) a risk assessment of the tree must be undertaken by a person who has completed a training program acceptable to the Board.

(2) If a risk assessment under subsection (1) determines that a tree poses a risk to a worker, the recommendations made in the risk assessment for eliminating or minimizing the risk must be implemented before the work referred to in that subsection starts.

(3) Despite subsections (1) and (2), if work in a forestry operation is to be carried out in an area that has more than 500 dangerous trees per hectare, the Board may approve a request to work without felling or assessing all the dangerous trees if, before the work starts,

(a) a person who has completed a training program acceptable to the Board conducts a risk assessment of a representative sample of the dangerous trees, and

(b) any recommendations made in the risk assessment for eliminating or minimizing the risks are implemented.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.12 Vehicle load limits

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

Back to Top

Equipment Operation

26.12.1 Equipment capabilities

(1) Any equipment designed for a specific function in a forestry operation or adapted for use in a forestry operation must be capable of performing safely the functions for which it is being used.

(2) The requirements of subsection (1) are met if the equipment is used

(a) in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions,

(b) as specified by a professional engineer, or

(c) in a manner acceptable to the Board.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.12.2 Radio controlled equipment

In a forestry operation, any equipment that is controlled by a remote control device must be equipped with a "fail safe" or "stop" mechanism that becomes operational if the remote control device fails.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.13 Non-slip floors and controls

Foot controls, floors, steps and similar surfaces where workers in a forestry operation walk or stand must be constructed of, or covered with, a non-slip material suitable for the footwear worn.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.13.1 Equipment operator protections

(1) Protective guards must be provided and used on a self-loading log transporter or similar equipment unless

(a) it is not practicable to do so, and

(b) the absence of guards does not pose a hazard to the equipment operator.

(2) The heel bar on the operator's side of the loader boom of a self-loading log transporter must be equipped with a deflector shelf and must not be used for heeling logs.

(3) If pushing or pulling the boom too far on logging equipment could cause the backstop to crush the equipment operator's cab, boom stops must be installed on the equipment.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.13.2 Maintaining operator vision

Log handling equipment must not be moved with a load lifted higher than is necessary to provide unobstructed vision for the equipment operator.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.13.3 Mobile yarders

(1) A mobile yarder must have a permanently attached, legible and easily visible sign provided by the equipment manufacturer or a professional engineer that includes the following:

(a) the name of the manufacturer and the date of manufacture of the yarder, unless this information cannot be determined;

(b) the model and serial number of the yarder, unless this information cannot be determined;

(c) if the yarder is designed for skyline, slackline or modified slackline systems, the maximum and minimum size of skyline, mainline and haulback that must be used;

(d) the maximum diameter of the mainline of the yarder;

(e) if required for the yarder, the minimum size, number and placement of guylines;

(f) if required for the yarder, the placement and number of outriggers;

(g) the permissible yarding angles of the yarder;

(h) the auxiliary equipment that may be safely attached to the yarder.

(2) Subsection (1) is satisfied if the information is available at the workplace where the mobile yarder is located.

(3) A mobile yarder must be rigged and used in accordance with the information provided under subsection (1) (c) to (h).

(4) A mobile yarder must not be moved with the spar or tower in the vertical operating position unless the stability of the equipment can be maintained.

(5) Multiple throttle controls on a mobile yarder must be arranged to prevent the simultaneous operation of 2 or more controls.

(6) A mobile yarder and its attached equipment must be inspected frequently and at least as often as specified in the equipment manufacturer's instructions.

(7) Manufacturer's manuals for a mobile yarder must be available, at the workplace where the yarder is located, to the following persons:

(a) the yarder operator;

(b) any person maintaining the yarder.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.13.4 Saw chain shot

(1) In this section, "saw chain shot" means one or more parts of a saw chain travelling at a high speed as a result of the saw chain breaking.

(2) This section applies to mobile equipment that is

(a) used in mechanical falling activities or log processing,

(b) equipped with a saw that cuts using a saw chain, and

(c) manufactured on or after May 1, 2019.

(3) Mobile equipment must meet one of the following requirements:

(a) the mobile equipment must have protective guards or other devices that prevent the mobile equipment’s cab windows from being directly struck by saw chain shot from the mobile equipment's saw chain;

(b) each cab window that could be directly struck by saw chain shot from the mobile equipment's saw chain must

(i) be made of one or more sheets of polycarbonate that have a total thickness of at least 32 mm (1.25 in), or

(ii) meet or exceed the requirements of the level 1 ballistics tests of ANSI/UL 752, Standard for Bullet-Resisting Equipment, 11th edition (with revisions made on or before December 11, 2015).

(4) For the purposes of subsection (3), saw chain shot that ricochets off an object and then strikes a cab window is not considered to have directly struck the cab window.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.]

26.14 Equipment clearance

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.14.1 Hazard area of logging equipment

(1) A hazard area created by the operation of logging equipment must be identified.

(2) Every hazard area identified under subsection (1) must be communicated to all workers in close proximity to the operating logging equipment and to the hazard area.

(3) A worker must not enter into or proceed on foot through a hazard area referred to in subsection (1) unless the equipment operator first gives permission to the worker in a clear and unmistakable manner.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.14.2 Designated safe work area

(1) A safe work area must be designated for workers on foot in close proximity to any operating logging equipment.

(2) The boundaries of a safe work area designated under subsection (1) must be communicated to all workers within and in close proximity to the safe work area.

(3) No equipment may enter into or proceed through a safe work area unless

(a) the equipment operator first obtains permission in a clear and unmistakable manner from all of the workers in that safe work area or from the supervisor of those workers, and

(b) those workers take a safe position.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.14.3 Traffic control

If vehicles on a road in a forestry operation are required to drive through a hazard area identified in section 26.14.1 or through a safe work area designated in section 26.14.2, effective traffic control appropriate to the hazard must be implemented.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.15 Log pile heights

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.16 Slope limitations

(1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

(2) If the manufacturer's maximum slope operating stability limit for logging equipment is known, the equipment must be operated within that limit.

(3) If the manufacturer's maximum slope operating stability limit for logging equipment is not known, the equipment must be operated within the following limits:

(a) a rubber tired skidder must not be operated on a slope which exceeds 35%;

(b) a crawler tractor, feller buncher, excavator and other similar equipment must not be operated on a slope which exceeds 40%;

(c) any other forestry equipment specifically designed for use on a steep slope must not be operated on a slope which exceeds 50%.

(4) Despite subsections (2) and (3) but subject to subsection (5), logging equipment may be operated beyond the maximum slope operating stability limits specified in those subsections if

(a) a qualified person conducts a risk assessment of that operation, and

(b) written safe work practices acceptable to the Board are developed and implemented to ensure the equipment's stability during operation.

(5) Despite anything in this section, logging equipment must not be operated in a particular location or manner if its stability cannot be assured during that operation.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.17 Weather conditions

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.18 Landslides

In a forestry operation where there may be a risk of a landslide

(a) the risk must be assessed in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board,

(b) if a risk is found to be present, written safe work procedures must be developed meeting the requirements of the standard, and

(c) workers must be educated in the safe work procedures.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.]

26.19 Forest fire fighting

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.20 Night operations

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

Manual Falling and Bucking

26.20.1 Application

Sections 26.21 to 26.29 apply only to manual falling and bucking activities.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.21 Faller qualifications

(1) A worker must not fall trees or be permitted to fall trees, or conduct or be permitted to conduct bucking activities associated with falling trees, unless

(a) the worker is qualified to do so to a standard acceptable to the Board, and

(b) the work being performed is within the documented and demonstrated capabilities of that worker.

(2) Subsection (1) (a) does not apply to a worker who is in a falling or bucking training program that is acceptable to the Board.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.22 Forestry operation faller training

(1) A worker may not work as a faller in a forestry operation unless the worker receives training for falling that is acceptable to the Board and is certified in writing as a competent faller under this section.

(2) Without limiting subsection (1), faller training must include the following:

(a) taking basic training in falling trees by working one-on-one with a qualified faller or trainer for a period of not less than 30 days;

(b) in the presence of a qualified supervisor or trainer, taking a written or oral examination on falling;

(c) after completion of basic training under paragraph (a) and passing the examination under paragraph (b), working as a trainee faller under the close supervision of a qualified faller or trainer for a minimum period specified in subsection (3).

(3) The required minimum supervision period in subsection (2) (c) is

(a) 180 days, or

(b) a shorter period as determined by a qualified supervisor or trainer, if the supervisor or trainer is satisfied that the worker is competent to perform the tasks of a faller.

(4) The person supervising a trainee faller under subsection (2) (c) must

(a) evaluate the trainee's work on a weekly basis,

(b) keep records of all evaluations done in respect of the trainee, and

(c) if, at the end of the training period, the trainee's falling activity meets a standard acceptable to the Board, verify in writing that the trainee has demonstrated the competence necessary for certification under subsection (5).

(5) If all of the requirements of subsections (1), (2) and (4) are satisfied in respect of a worker who is a trainee faller, a person acceptable to the Board may certify in writing that the worker is a competent faller.

(6) A record of the training that is taken under this section must be maintained and kept in a form and manner acceptable to the Board and a copy of that record must be made available to an officer or the trainee to whom the record pertains.

(7) Subsection (2) does not apply to a worker who satisfies all of the following requirements:

(a) the worker has performed falling duties regularly for at least 2 years before the evaluation under paragraph (b) of this subsection takes place;

(b) the worker's falling activity is evaluated by a qualified supervisor or trainer and it meets a standard acceptable to the Board;

(c) in the presence of a qualified supervisor or trainer, the worker passes a written or oral examination on falling;

(d) the worker is certified in writing as a competent faller by a person acceptable to the Board.

(8) For the purposes of subsection (7) (b), the qualified supervisor or trainer must

(a) keep a record of the evaluation, and

(b) verify in writing that the worker has demonstrated the competence necessary for certification under subsection (7) (d).

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.22.1 Falling supervisors for forestry operations

(1) A qualified supervisor must be designated for all falling and associated bucking activities in a forestry operation.

(2) The supervisor designated under subsection (1) must

(a) ensure that the falling and bucking activities are planned and conducted in accordance with this Regulation,

(b) inspect the workplace of each faller at time intervals appropriate to the risks, and

(c) keep a record of every inspection conducted under paragraph (b).

(3) The supervisor designated under subsection (1) must not undertake or be assigned activities which interfere with performance of the supervisor's duties under subsection (2).

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.23 Procedures for falling and bucking

(1) In this section and in section 26.24, "brushing" means the striking of a standing tree by a tree being felled if the strike is a direct blow or a glancing blow of sufficient force to cause one or more branches to break at or near the stem of the standing tree.

(2) Fallers and buckers associated with falling activities must be provided with and follow written safe work practices acceptable to the Board for the type of work activity they perform, including procedures for the following:

(a) establishing minimum and maximum distances between fallers and other workers;

(b) planning and constructing escape routes;

(c) controlling the fall of trees;

(d) minimizing unnecessary brushing;

(e) dealing with dangerous trees;

(f) bucking trees and logs;

(g) using mechanical assistance to fall trees;

(h) summoning and rendering assistance to manage a falling difficulty or to deal with an emergency;

(i) conducting special or innovative harvesting techniques;

(j) ensuring the well-being of each faller and bucker at least every half hour and at the end of the work shift.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.24 Responsibility for falling and bucking

(1) Subject to section 26.29 (3), before a tree is felled, all workers must be clear of the area within a 2 tree-length radius of the tree.

(2) Before falling or bucking starts, all obstructions to the activity must be cleared and a safe escape route to a predetermined safe position must be prepared.

(3) A tree must not be felled if it could strike any stationary or running line of any operational equipment.

(4) If it is necessary to pack or shovel snow to reduce stump height, the depth of the depression at the base of the tree must not exceed 45 cm (18 in.).

(5) The falling of a tree must be conducted in accordance with the following procedures:

(a) a sufficient undercut must be used;

(b) the undercut must be complete and cleaned out;

(c) sufficient holding wood must be maintained;

(d) the backcut must be higher than the undercut to provide a step on the stump;

(e) wedging tools must be immediately available and, unless the tree has a pronounced favourable lean, wedges must be set.

(5.1) When a tree is being felled, the tree must not brush standing trees if that can be avoided.

(6) A tree must not be used to cause another partially cut tree to fall in succession unless

(a) it is necessary to do so to overcome a specific falling difficulty, and

(b) the succession falling is done in accordance with subsection (6.1).

(6.1) The following apply for the purposes of subsection (6):

(a) only one tree may be used to cause another partially cut tree to fall in succession;

(b) only those trees necessary to deal with the falling difficulty referred to in subsection (6) are partially cut;

(c) a wedge is driven into the backcut of each partially cut tree.

(7) When a tree starts to fall, the faller and any other worker present must move quickly to a predetermined safe position, at least 3 m (10 ft) away from the base of the tree where possible, and take cover if available.

(8) All workers must be clear of the hazard area before a tree or log is bucked.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.25 Dangerous trees and logs

(1) Falling or bucking must not be started if

(a) a tree or log is in a condition that, if felled or bucked in that condition, the tree or log would pose a reasonably foreseeable risk to a worker, or

(b) it appears that the tree cannot be completely felled or the bucking cut cannot be completed, as the case may be.

(2) If for any reason a partially cut tree cannot be completely felled and must be bypassed or left unattended, then the following apply:

(a) the tree must be clearly marked;

(b) work, other than that necessary to complete the falling of the tree, must stop in the hazard area until the tree is felled;

(c) any worker who could enter the hazard area must be alerted to the hazard;

(d) the supervisor for that falling activity must be notified.

(3) The supervisor referred to in subsection (2) (d) must ensure that

(a) all workers at risk are notified, and

(b) the tree is safely felled before other work is undertaken in the hazard area.

(4) If a bucking cut cannot be completed and the partially bucked log must be bypassed or left unattended, then the following apply:

(a) if possible, a distinct cross must immediately be cut or marked on the top of each end of the log;

(b) the supervisor for the bucking activity must be notified at the end of the work day;

(c) the supervisor for the bucking activity must notify all workers at risk.

(5) Subsections (2) to (4) do not apply if the incomplete falling or bucking is part of a planned process in which safe work practices acceptable to the Board are implemented.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.26 Falling dangerous trees

(1) Where practicable, dangerous trees must be felled

(a) progressively with the falling of other timber but before falling adjacent live trees, and

(b) into open areas.

(2) When falling a dangerous tree,

(a) dangerous bark must be removed, where practicable,

(b) stump height must, in the judgment of the faller, allow maximum visibility and freedom of action,

(c) the tree must be felled in the direction of lean whenever possible, and the undercut must be as deep as necessary to minimize the use of wedges and resulting vibration,

(d) pushing with a green tree must only be undertaken to overcome a falling difficulty, and

(e) wedging over must be used only if there is no alternative, and after a careful assessment of the ability of the dangerous tree to withstand wedging.

(3) If conventional methods cannot be safely employed to fall a dangerous tree, blasting or other acceptable methods must be used.

(4) Falling, bucking or limbing activities must not be undertaken in an area made hazardous by a dangerous tree, or a dangerous tree which has been brushed by a felled tree, until the dangerous tree has been felled.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.27 Location of fallers

(1) Fallers and buckers must not work in a location where they or other workers could be endangered by that work.

(2) If an elevation or steep slope poses a risk to a faller, the faller must be provided with and use an appropriate fall protection system.

(3) Any fall protection provided under subsection (2) must not impede the ability of the faller to move to a predetermined safe position as required in section 26.24 (7).

(4) A faller must not work in a location where the faller is supported solely by a lifeline and harness.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.28 Summoning assistance

(1) Qualified assistance must be readily available to fallers in case of difficulty, emergency or injury.

(2) Fallers and buckers must have an effective means to summon assistance.

26.29 Entry to falling area

(1) Only a worker with duties associated with the falling activity may enter an active falling area.

(2) Before entering the active falling area, workers must notify the faller or bucker and wait until advised by the faller or bucker that it is safe to enter.

(3) A worker, in addition to the faller, may be at the base of a tree being felled if the worker is

(a) supervising or directing the falling activity,

(b) training as a faller, or

(c) required to assist the faller to overcome a specific falling difficulty.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

Mechanical Falling

26.29.1 Application

Sections 26.29.2 to 26.29.5 apply only to mechanical falling activities.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.29.2 Limits on use of mechanical harvester

A mechanical harvester must not be used to fell a tree if

(a) the tree is in a condition that, if felled in that condition, it would pose a reasonably foreseeable risk to the harvester operator, or

(b) the mechanical harvester is not capable of falling the tree safely.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.29.3 Incomplete falling cuts

(1) If a partially cut tree cannot be completely felled by a mechanical harvester and must be bypassed or left unattended, the following apply:

(a) the tree must be clearly marked;

(b) work, other than that necessary to complete the falling of the tree, must stop in the hazard area until the tree is felled;

(c) any worker who could enter the hazard area must be alerted to the hazard;

(d) the person responsible for the direction and control of the mechanical harvesting activity must be notified.

(2) The person referred to in subsection (1) (d) must ensure that

(a) all workers at risk are notified, and

(b) the tree is safely felled before other work is undertaken in the hazard area.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply if incomplete falling is part of a planned process in which safe work practices acceptable to the Board are implemented.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.29.4 Hazard area

(1) Only a worker with duties associated with a mechanical falling activity may enter the active falling area.

(2) Before a tree is felled by a mechanical harvester, all workers and equipment, other than the equipment operator and the harvesting equipment, must be clear of the area within a 2 tree-length radius of the tree.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.29.5 No additional hazards

Mechanical falling activities must be conducted in a manner that does not create any additional hazard for workers conducting subsequent work activities.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Traffic Control for Falling Operations

26.30 Traffic control

If, in any type of falling activity, a tree being felled may create a hazard to a user of a road, effective traffic control must be used to stop or control approaching traffic.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Yarding

26.31 Equipment construction

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

26.32 Operator protection

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.33 Mobile yarders

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.33.1 Application

Sections 26.34 to 26.55 apply only to forestry operations.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.34 Signalling

(1) Only a designated worker may signal for the movement of cable yarding equipment, but any worker may signal to stop cable yarding equipment, and that signal must be obeyed promptly.

(2) The worker designated to signal the yarder operator must

(a) not be otherwise occupied while the equipment is in motion, and

(b) not signal for the movement of the equipment until assured that no workers are endangered within the area for which the designated worker is responsible.

(3) The signals for rigging movement must be clearly discernible to the equipment operator, and to all workers who could be endangered by the movement of the equipment.

(4) A worker who directs or operates equipment, or who could be endangered by the movement of equipment, must be familiar with the meaning of the signals.

(5) The equipment operator must stop the equipment if a signal is not clearly understood.

(6) If voice signals are being used that cannot be heard by workers who could be endangered by the movement of equipment, the equipment operator must not move the equipment until the operator has given a signal by means understandable to all those workers.

(6.1) If voice signals are being used to direct the operation of a grapple yarder, the signals specified in Table 26-8 must be used.

(7) If non-verbal signals such as whistles and hand signals are used to direct the operation of equipment, the signals specified in Tables 26-1 to 26-7 must be used.

(8) When audible signals are being used concurrently to direct the operation of more than one piece of equipment, the signal tones must be differentiated to clearly identify intended movement of each machine.

(9) Signalling devices must be tested at the start of each shift in a way that ensures that equipment will not be moved in response to the test.

(10) Defective signalling devices that might cause a hazard to workers must not be used, and repairs, alterations, or adjustments to signalling devices must be performed by qualified persons.

(11) A radio signalling device used to direct the movement of logging equipment must be designed, maintained and operated in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board.

(12) Any signalling system using radio frequency transmission must operate on a frequency and at a transmission power assigned and coordinated by a person acceptable to the Board.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.35 Radio controlled machines

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.36 Climbing equipment

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.37 Hoisting workers

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.38 Riding on rigging

(1) Subject to subsection (2), a worker must not be transported on any cable system unless

(a) the system is authorized for use in a rescue, an emergency, an inspection or maintenance and it is being used for that purpose,

(b) all other means for transportation are impracticable, and

(c) the system is capable of withstanding the loads and stresses to be placed on it.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if the system is designed

(a) by a professional engineer, and

(b) for the purpose of the transport of workers.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.39 Safe location

(1) A worker must not be positioned within the bight of any running line under tension, nor in a position where the worker could be struck by a line if it were to break or come loose, or be tightened if slack.

(2) A worker must be positioned in the clear to avoid being exposed to moving logs, saplings, root wads, chunks, rigging or other material.

(3) A worker must be positioned clear of rigging which is stopped by an obstruction until the rigging has been slackened to reduce the hazard.

(4) Despite subsection (1), a worker may enter the bight of a slack line to deal with an obstruction or set chokers.

(5) If a worker enters the bight of a running line pursuant to subsection (4), the rigging must not be tightened until a clear go-ahead signal has been given by the worker.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.39.1 Removal of potential hazards to rigging

(1) A tree must be felled if the tree could

(a) interfere with rig-up or with movement of lines and yarding equipment, or

(b) be pushed or pulled into an area where a worker is working.

(2) Saplings over 6 m (20 ft.) tall that

(a) are located in an area to be yarded, and

(b) constitute a reasonably foreseeable risk to workers must be felled before yarding activity begins.

(3) If it is not practicable to comply with subsection (2), safe work practices acceptable to the Board that eliminate or minimize the risk to workers in the forestry operation may be used if these safe work practices are directed by a supervisor.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.40 Anchors

(1) A standing tree may be used for anchoring lines or fastening blocks only if

(a) a suitable stump is not available, and

(b) the tree is effectively tied back to another anchor, except that a secondary anchor tree need not be tied back.

(1.1) A standing tree must not be used to anchor guylines if a worker would be endangered were the tree to be pulled over.

(2) A stump or tree must not be used as an anchor for a line or for fastening a block until it has been determined that it is suitable for use as an anchor, and it must be inspected daily to determine that it remains suitable for continued use.

(2.1) An anchor to which a haulback block is attached must have a notch of sufficient depth to retain the strap or must provide equivalent security by other effective means.

(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

(4) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

(5) If a log, pipe or other apparatus buried in the ground is used to anchor a guyline or skyline, the method and equipment used must be acceptable to the Board and

(a) the guyline or skyline must not be directly attached to the anchor,

(b) a suitable strap or line of equal size and strength to the guyline or skyline with eyes in each end must be used, with one wrap around the anchor, and both eyes attached to the guyline or skyline with a shackle, and

(c) the eye connection of the anchor strap must be visible for inspection.

(6) Any anchor system not otherwise referred to in this section must be used in accordance with

(a) its design specifications and manufacturer's recommendations, or

(b) if those specifications or recommendations are not known, a method acceptable to the Board.

(7) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

(8) If an anchor system has 2 or more legs, bridle blocks of adequate strength must be used to distribute the load equally.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 253/2001, effective January 28, 2002.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.41 Guylines

(1) Guylines for a mobile yarder must be positioned

(a) as specified by the manufacturer, or

(b) in a manner acceptable to the Board.

(2) Guylines must be rigged to provide a 45 degree or larger angle between the guyline and a line drawn plumb through the guyline fairlead.

(3) If it is not practicable to comply with subsection (1) or (2), or if suitable anchors are not available, additional steps must be taken to ensure the stability of the yarder.

(4) Guylines must be attached to the supported structure by guyline shackles, or other fastenings providing equivalent security.

(5) Safety devices with breaking strength at least equal to that of the guylines must be installed at the top of mobile spars to prevent guylines or their assemblies from falling.

(6) Guylines over a travelled road must be rigged to clear all traffic, or if this is not practicable,

(a) the guylines must be conspicuously marked, and

(b) signs warning of limited clearance must be posted on the road.

(7) A guyline must be secured to its anchor stump in the following manner:

(a) a notch of sufficient depth, or another means of equivalent security, must be used to retain the wrapping lines;

(b) sleeve shackles, knob and bell, screwy hooks or line clamps compatible with the guyline size must be used.

(8) If spikes are used to secure a guyline to an anchor stump, there must be at least

(a) 8 spikes in the first wrap, 3 spikes in the second wrap and 8 spikes in the last wrap if the guyline is attached to the yarder, or

(b) 3 spikes in the last wrap if the guyline is attached to a back spar.

(9) If spikes are used to secure a guyline to an anchor stump, there must be a minimum of 2 1/2 wraps of the guyline around the anchor stump.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

Figure 26-1 Positioning guylines for mobile yarders

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.42 Rigging

(1) Rigging must be of a type and size for which the equipment is designed.

(2) Lines, blocks, and yarding and loading equipment must be rigged in accordance with accepted industry standards.

(3) Shackle pins on stationary lines must be secured with molly hogans or other acceptable means to prevent accidental dislodgement.

(4) Molly hogans must not be used to connect skylines, loading rigging, or any stationary lines.

(5) Screw pin shackles used on running lines must be tightened securely and routinely inspected.

(6) Rigging must be inspected at regular and frequent intervals by a qualified worker.

26.43 Supporting blocks

Straps for supporting blocks must

(a) be made from wire rope or synthetic fibre material, and

(b) be of sufficient size and condition to withstand the maximum anticipated loads.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.44 Winches

(1) When properly anchored to a winch, the minimum number of wraps of cable left on a winch drum must be

(a) for skylines, 1 1/2 layers, and

(b) for other types of logging equipment, 3 complete wraps.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a skidding winch mounted on ground-based skidding equipment.

26.45 Prohibition of knots

A knot must not be used in any winch line or other rigging, except

(a) to effect temporary repair in the event of line breakage, or

(b) for tag lines on grapple log loaders or for hooks on strawline eyes.

26.46 Skyline anchors

(1) A skyline must be anchored to

(a) a stump or to a suitable manufactured anchor,

(b) the base of a standing tree if the tree is tied back to a secondary anchor, or

(c) a suitable piece of mobile equipment.

(2) A skyline must be secured to an anchor by

(a) a choker using a large sleeve-type knockout pin shackle or an approved safety pin-type shackle over the skyline with the pin through the eye,

(b) a strap acceptable to the Board, with both eyes hung in a shackle and the knockout pin or safety pin through the eye of the skyline, or

(c) a wire rope clip system meeting the requirements of Part 15.

(3) If anchor stumps in standing timber are used for slackline or other skyline operations, the skyline must be prevented from striking trees in the area, or the trees must be felled.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.47 Skyline extensions

If a skyline extension is used

(a) the breaking strength of the extension must be greater than or equal to that of the skyline,

(b) the extension must not alter the safe capacity of the tower, and

(c) if the carriage runs over it, the extension must be attached by a regular long splice or by a flush pin straight side shackle connecting the 2 eyes.

26.48 Skyline spars

(1) Each skyline spar must be of adequate strength.

(2) An intermediate spar must be used in a manner acceptable to the Board.

(3) Backspars must be topped unless workers are prohibited from entering the hazard area created when the skyline is loaded.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.49 Skyline rigging

(1) When rigged in a backspar, a skyline must be anchored no more than 8° off-line from the rearward projection of the skyline.

(2) If a suitable anchor cannot be found to comply with subsection (1), another suitable anchor may be used provided that the backspar is stabilized by extra guylines.

(3) The rearward projection of the skyline must

(a) not be considered a guyline, and

(b) not make an angle greater than 50° measured from the horizontal as it leaves the backspar unless approved by a professional engineer.

(4) The method used to support a skyline at a backspar or intermediate spar must provide adequate support and protection for the line.

(5) A skyline must not be fastened directly to a backspar.

26.50 Backspar guylines

(1) A tree used as a backspar must be guyed with a sufficient number of guylines to ensure that the tree is adequately supported.

(2) If spikes are used to anchor a backspar guyline

(a) the guyline must have at least 2 1/2 wraps around the stump, and

(b) three spikes must be placed in sound wood on the last wrap.

(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.51 Lift trees

A lift tree must be topped or guyed unless

(a) the tree is of adequate strength to withstand the loads that are placed on it during yarding activities,

(b) the lines run through tail-hold blocks located so as to minimize stress on the tree, and

(c) tail-holds are rigged and located to prevent a worker from being endangered if the tree is pulled over.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.52 Corridor logging

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Skidding

26.53 Ground skidding operations

Ground based skidding operations must be conducted using safe work practices acceptable to the Board, including, without limitation, the following:

(a) not winching at an angle that could cause an obstruction to upset the equipment;

(b) to avoid obstruction hang-up and rollover, if practicable, winching the turn up tight to the equipment before the equipment is moved;

(c) selecting a suitable gear to maintain control of the equipment before climbing or descending grades;

(d) dropping the turn to free the log if an unchoked log is picked up with a turn;

(e) avoiding abrupt turns of equipment on side hills.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.54 Equipment stability

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.55 Mainline release

A skidding winch on a ground based skidding machine must have a quick-release system to permit the winch line to run out freely and automatically disengage from its drum.

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Forestry Work Areas

26.56 Work area arrangement

(1) In this section, "work area" includes any area in which any forestry work is done but does not include the travelled portion of a road unless that portion of the road is being used as a landing.

(2) Work in a work area in a forestry operation must be planned and the work area must be located, constructed, maintained and operated to ensure the following:

(a) logs can be moved safely in the area;

(b) log piles and equipment used to handle the logs do not become unstable or otherwise create a hazard;

(c) workers are able to work in locations clear of moving logs and equipment;

(d) workers are not exposed to incoming or runaway logs or other debris;

(e) the area is kept free from buildup of bark and other debris to the extent that it would pose a risk to workers;

(f) an effective method of dust control is used and maintained.

(3) Log piles must, to the extent practicable, be located on stable and relatively level ground.

(4) Log piles must not be higher than the safe operating reach of equipment being used to handle the logs.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.57 Equipment locations

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.58 Limbing and bucking restrictions

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.59 Suspended logs

(1) A log must not be passed over any worker or occupied vehicle or equipment.

(2) Despite subsection (1), a log may be passed over a vehicle or equipment that is being loaded, if the log

(a) does not pass over any portion of the vehicle or equipment that is occupied by a person, and

(b) does not constitute a hazard for the occupant of the vehicle or equipment.

(3) A worker must not stand or pass under a suspended log.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.60 Log handling equipment

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.61 Vehicle movements

(1) Effective means of communication must be used in a forestry operation to control vehicle movements in any location where

(a) a loader operator is unable to see the loading operation, or

(b) trucks are moving at landings, load-out points, water dumps, dry land sorts or railway reloads.

(2) If, for the purposes of subsection (1), audible signals are used as the means of communication, the signals must meet the requirements of section 26.34 and Table 26.2.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.62 Maintenance

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.63 Unauthorized persons

Only persons permitted by by law or by the workplace safe work procedures may be at landings, load-out points, water dumps, dry land sorts and railway reloads.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.64 Bunk and stake assemblies

Bunk and stake assemblies, installed at a dry land sort for bundling logs, must have fixed stakes or be used with safe work procedures which ensure that no worker goes into the hazard area adjacent to or below self-tripping stakes unless the stakes are secured from releasing.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Hauling

26.65 Cab guard

(1) In this section:

"cab guard" means a barrier guarding the back of the cab of a log transporter;

"certified welding inspector" means a person who is certified as a Level 2 or Level 3 welding inspector in accordance with CSA Standard W178.2-08 (R2013), Certification of Welding Inspectors;

"rated capacity", in relation to a cab guard, means the maximum cargo weight that may be transported by the log transporter and shift and contact the cab guard such that the cab guard is capable of withstanding a horizontal forward static load equal to 40% of that cargo weight, with this load uniformly distributed over the entire cab guard.

(2) For the protection of the driver of a log transporter, the log transporter must have a cab guard that meets all of the following requirements:

(a) subject to subsection (3), the cab guard is at least 15 cm (6 in) higher than the cab;

(b) the cab guard is at least as wide as the cab;

(c) the cab guard has no opening large enough to permit any item of cargo to pass through it;

(d) the cab guard is

(i) constructed with a main supporting structure made of steel, or

(ii) certified by a professional engineer as having a main supporting structure designed and constructed so that vibration and distortion generated by use of the log transporter cannot damage the cab guard;

(e) the cab guard is installed in a manner that ensures that the rated capacity of the cab guard is not diminished.

(3) The cab guard of a self-loading log transporter may be less than the height specified in subsection (2)(a) but must not be less than the cab height.

(4) The weight of cargo that is being transported by a log transporter and that may shift and contact the cab guard must not exceed the rated capacity of the cab guard.

(5) The operator of a log transporter must record the results of the inspection, made before the start of operation on the shift, of the cab guard of the log transporter.

(6) A log transporter must be removed from service if there are any cracks, damage or other conditions that will decrease the rated capacity of the cab guard of the log transporter.

(7) A log transporter removed from service under subsection (6) must not be returned to service until

(a) the cab guard is

(i) repaired, and

(ii) inspected and certified to meet the rated capacity by the manufacturer, a professional engineer or a certified welding inspector, or

(b) the cab guard is replaced by a cab guard that meets the requirements of this section.

(8) The cab guard of a log transporter must be

(a) permanently marked with

(i) the name and address of its manufacturer,

(ii) the model number or serial number of the cab guard, and

(iii) the rated capacity of the cab guard, or

(b) identified by carrying in the log transporter a copy of a letter that

(i) accurately describes the barrier cab guard,

(ii) certifies the model number or serial number of the barrier cab guard and the rated capacity of the cab guard, and

(iii) has been signed by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.]

26.66 Bunks and stakes

(1) Trucks, trailers and semitrailers used for transporting logs must be equipped with bunks and stakes of adequate design and construction to safely perform their intended function.

(2) Bunks must be able to rotate freely upon their pivots, if designed to do so.

(3) Stakes, extensions and stake lines must be installed and maintained to ensure that when the log transporter is loaded

(a) the angle between the bunks and stakes at the base does not exceed 90°, and

(b) the angle between the bunks and the stakes and extensions above the base does not exceed the angle at which the stakes and extensions can safely withstand the maximum anticipated loads.

(4) Stakes must be constructed so that

(a) they can be released only from the opposite end of the bunk,

(b) keeper pins are secured against unintended release, and

(c) if they are over 1.2 m (4 ft) in height, springs or other mechanical means are fitted to facilitate their returning to a vertical position.

(4.1) A worker must not go on bunks and trailer assemblies to raise or lower stakes and extensions unless it is impracticable to do otherwise.

(4.2) If a worker must go on a bunk or trailer assembly to collapse stakes or extensions, the worker must be provided a safe means of getting on and off the bunk or trailer assembly.

(4.3) Procedures must be developed and implemented for collapsing stakes or extensions during adverse weather conditions.

(5) Stake extensions must be secured against inadvertent detachment from the stakes.

(6) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

(7) Stake lines must

(a) not be made from swaged wire rope, and

(b) conform to the following specifications.

 Bunk width  Stake line minimum diameter
metres feet millimetres inches
up to 2.6 up to 8 1/2 22 7/8
2.6 to 3.7 8 1/2 to 12 29 1 1/8
over 3.7 over 12 32 1 1/4

(8) Stake and bunk assemblies must be inspected daily, and must not be used if they show signs of excessive wear.

(8.1) A record of all inspections conducted under subsection (8) must be maintained.

(9) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.67 Load specifications

(1) In order to control the movement of a log transporter while it is being loaded, an effective means of communication must be established between the transporter operator and any worker loading the logs.

(1.1) Logs must not be loaded on a log transporter unless all workers in the vicinity are in a safe location and clear of any moving logs or logs that might move or fall during that operation.

(1.2) While a log transporter is being loaded, a worker must not stand on the cab platform of the transporter or between the transporter cab and a log being loaded.

(1.3) Logs must be loaded on a log transporter in a manner that meets all of the following requirements:

(a) the load must be stable without the use of binders;

(b) the transporter and the load must remain stable while in transit;

(c) the strain on the binder units, bunk stake lines or stakes must not exceed the load that the units, lines or stakes are designed to bear;

(d) the free and full movement of the transporter must not be impaired.

(2) To ensure that stakes remain at a safe angle, the first tier of logs must be laid tight, and arranged to minimize slack in the stake cables.

(3) Unless securely restrained by other means to prevent logs from slipping off, the bottom tier and the side rows of the log load must extend beyond the front and rear bunks and stakes

(a) at least 30 cm (12 in) on trucks with compensating reach type trailers, or

(b) at least 15 cm (6 in) on other types of trailers.

(4) The log length on a log transporter must not exceed the design capacity of the road.

(5) A log whose length is not contained by the stakes must not be loaded above the level of the stakes unless the log

(a) is in a secure lay, and

(b) does not have excessive crook, sweep or deformity.

(5.1) Hazardous limbs must not be transported on a log transporter.

(5.2) A worker must not stand on any part of a load of logs on a log transporter.

(6) Repealed [B.C. Reg 313/2001, effective March 27, 2002.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg 313/2001, effective March 27, 2002.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.68 Binders

(1) Unless the centres of all logs lie below the level of the top of the stakes on a log transporter, at least 2 binders must be installed to restrain the logs before the transporter is moved.

(1.1) If the logs are preloaded onto a trailer, the binders required under subsection (1) must be installed immediately after the loading and before the trailer is connected to the tractor of the logging truck.

(2) A loaded log transporter may be moved within the loading area without the binders required under subsection (1) if no worker is exposed to the risk of a falling log or other falling debris.

(3) If logs or log chunks could roll or slide off the log transporter, or the logs or log chunks are not contained within stakes, at least 2 binders must be used to secure the logs regardless of the height of the load.

(3.1) All binders that must be in place before a load of logs may be transported must be put on

(a) as soon as practicable after loading, and

(b) in a location in close proximity to the loading area.

(3.2) Loads or logs must not be moved or shifted while binders are being applied or adjusted.

(3.3) A binder on a load of logs must be checked and kept tight during transportation of the logs.

(4) Each binder and attachment must have a breaking strength of at least 53 kN (12,000 lbs).

(5) Bundle straps or banding must not be used as binders to restrain logs during hauling.

(5.1) Subsection (5) does not apply in a loading area if no worker is exposed to the risk of a falling log or other falling debris.

(6) Binders must be positioned on the load so that they can be safely removed while the load restraining equipment is in position.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.69 Binder removal

(1) In this section, "binder removal station" means a structure that is designed to protect a worker, when releasing binders or stakes, from the maximum anticipated load of falling or sliding logs or log chunks.

(2) Written safe work procedures acceptable to the Board must be developed for

(a) removing binders, and

(b) the use of a binder removal station.

(3) The written procedures developed under subsection (2) must be

(a) posted in a visible location at any place where binders are removed, including a binder removal station, and

(b) maintained in a legible condition.

(4) Binders must not be removed when a worker is preparing to unload logs from a log transporter unless

(a) a binder removal station is being used, or

(b) the logs are otherwise restrained to prevent them from falling on the worker who is releasing the binders or stakes.

(5) Once binders have been removed from a load of logs, the unrestrained load must not be moved if any worker is exposed to the risk of a falling log or other falling debris.

(6) A binder removal station must not be used unless it is certified by a professional engineer as capable of performing its intended function.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective January 1, 2009.]

26.70 Unguarded equipment

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.71 Operating provisions

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.71.1 Operating procedures

(1) The operator of a log transporter must follow safe operating procedures.

(2) Without limiting subsection (1), the operator referred to in subsection (1) must

(a) not overtake another moving industrial vehicle, except on a signal from the other vehicle operator,

(b) use extreme caution when approaching vehicles coming from the opposite direction,

(c) keep a safe distance when following crew transportation vehicles, having due regard for road and grade conditions and visibility,

(d) drive at a speed appropriate to the log transporter's capabilities, the road design and condition, the traffic, the visibility and the weather conditions, and

(e) not operate the log transporter while impaired by

(i) fatigue, or

(ii) any other cause, substance or matter

that could prevent the operator from operating the log transporter safely.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.71.2 Daily log

(1) In this section, "hauling cycle" means the time allowed for each round trip.

(2) The operator of a log transporter must maintain a daily log into which must be entered the following information:

(a) the date of the entry;

(b) the printed name of the operator;

(c) the truck licence plate or unit number;

(d) the odometer reading of the truck at the beginning of the day, if the truck has an odometer;

(e) the name of each contractor or employer for whom the operator worked during the day;

(f) the start and stop time of each trip the operator makes;

(g) the distance driven for each trip the operator makes;

(h) the total distance driven by the operator during the day;

(i) the total driving hours during the day;

(j) the hauling cycle.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.72 Warning devices

A log transporter must be equipped with a horn or whistle which, under normal conditions,

(a) is distinctly audible at a distance of 300 m (1,000 ft), and

(b) has a tone distinct from the whistles used by yarders or loaders in the vicinity.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.73 Non-slip steps

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.74 Restriction

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.75 Riders

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.76 Securing trailers

(1) Empty log transporter trailers, when loaded onto tractors, must be adequately secured against dislodgement.

(2) Handholds or other suitable facilities must be installed on trailer or semi-trailer reaches if workers are required to manually assist in coupling them to tractors.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.77 Assistance on steep grades

If the braking power of equipment is insufficient to provide adequate control on a slope, the vehicle must be snubbed or assisted.

26.78 Transporting workers

An operator of a vehicle transporting workers in a forestry operation on a road must not overtake and pass a moving and loaded log transporter or low bed transport truck, unless

(a) that operator receives a signal to proceed from the operator of the loaded log transporter or the operator of the low bed transport truck, and

(b) the road conditions are suitable for that manoeuvre.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

Roads and Road Maintenance

26.79 Haul road standards

Roads, bridges, elevated platforms, and other structures used by vehicles transporting workers, logs or other forest products in forestry operations must be constructed and maintained to a standard which will permit safe transit.

26.80 Creating additional hazards

Road or skid trail construction, including any blasting activity, must be carried out in a manner that prevents hangups, hanging broken tops or limbs, leaners, sidebind of pushed trees, or similar hazards which could endanger fallers or other workers.

26.81 Bull rails

The open sides of bridges, elevated truck weigh scales and associated elevated ramp approaches, and other elevated structures used by logging trucks must be equipped with substantial and well secured continuous timber or log curbs or bull rails of sufficient height to prevent vehicles from running off the structure, but not less than 25 cm (10 in).

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

26.82 Roadside hazards

(1) Dangerous trees, loose rocks, stumps, or other unstable materials that are hazardous to road users must be removed or cleared for a safe distance back from roadsides or roadside banks.

(2) Brush, foliage or debris which prevents an adequate view by a vehicle operator of traffic approaching at roadway intersections or on sharp curves must be cleared and all possible precautions must otherwise be taken to control the hazards created by limited sight distance.

26.83 Traffic control systems

(1) An effective traffic control system must be used by all vehicles on a section of road that is too narrow to permit 2 or more vehicles to pass.

(2) The traffic control system must include

(a) turnouts, where required,

(b) vehicles operating with their headlights and, if fitted, flashing beacons, turned on,

(c) warning signs where required, and

(d) instructional signs, including kilometre and road name or number signs.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.]

26.83.1 Radio traffic control

Instructional signs must be posted showing

(a) radio channels on a road or a section of a road where radio channels are being used for traffic control, or

(b) radio frequencies on a road or a section of a road where radio frequencies, but not radio channels, are being used for traffic control.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.]

26.84 Weigh scales

(1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

(2) Weight recording house structures, forming part of a log transporter weigh scale unit, must

(a) be sufficiently offset from the scale balance platform to provide an adequate margin for log load clearance, or

(b) have an effective barrier erected between the weigh scale deck and the house.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Water Operations

26.85 Condition of boats

(1) A boat used in or about a forestry operation must be maintained in good mechanical and seaworthy condition.

(2) A boat must be inspected daily before first use, and thereafter as required, and defects must

(a) be reported immediately in writing to the supervisor, and

(b) if they affect the safe operation of the boat, be remedied before the boat is used.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.86 Boat equipment

(1) A boat must be equipped with

(a) effective machinery guarding that meets the requirements of this Regulation,

(b) effective guards or insulation on hot exhaust pipes or stacks,

(c) suitable cabins, screens or guards to protect operators against injury from towline breakage if the boats are regularly required to pull logs, booms or barges,

(d) suitable cabins, screens, or guards meeting the requirements of WCB Standard G606, Boom Boat Operator Protective Structures if operators are subject to injury from logs or limbs intruding into the control area,

(e) suitable hydraulic or other steering systems that will not transmit forces that could cause injury to the operator through feedback of rudder reaction,

(f) deck matting or other surface cover which provides an effective grip for caulked footwear, and

(g) effective heating.

(2) A boat operated in navigable waters during the period from sunset to sunrise, or in conditions of restricted visibility, must

(a) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

(b) have deck and cabin lighting, where necessary to provide safe levels of illumination aboard the craft, and

(c) have searchlights or floodlights, where necessary to facilitate safe navigation and to illuminate working or boarding areas adjacent to the craft.

(3) Buoyancy equipment meeting the requirements of Part 8 (Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment) must be worn by each worker on a boom boat or in an open boat.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

* See also section 4.4 of the OHS Regulation.
26.87 Boat size

(1) A boat used for breaking down unstable groups of logs which are criss-crossed or difficult to break free must be of sufficient size to ensure that vessel stability is not compromised.

(2) A boat must not be used to tow log booms or barges, that, by reason of weight, wind, current or sea conditions, are beyond the capacity of the towing craft to safely control.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.88 Overloading

A boat must not be loaded with personnel or equipment so as to adversely affect its stability or seaworthiness.

26.89 Presence of operator

When a boat is used to push, pull or restrain log bundles during breaking operations, the operator must remain on the boat unless the boat is firmly secured to the log bundles in a manner that allows the operator to get on and off safely.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.90 Wind and sea conditions

A boat designed for use in calm waters must not be operated in wind or sea conditions that adversely affect its safe operation.

26.91 Hand signals

If the movement of a boat is regulated by hand signals, the code of signals authorized by the Board must be followed.

26.92 Elevated work platforms

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.93 General requirements for booming

(1) Log booms must be made up and sized with due regard for the size and quality of the available rigging.

(2) Booming grounds must be of sufficient width to safely accommodate booms that are being worked on.

(3) Booming grounds must be provided with safe access.

[Amended by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.94 Rigging

(1) Booming chains, swifters and related items of rigging used in booming operations must be maintained in safe condition.

(2) Rigging which is damaged or deteriorated enough to be a danger to workers must be removed from service.

(3) The owner of the facility receiving a completed log boom must ensure that boomsticks are

(a) stripped of excess rigging before they are returned into service, and

(b) secured in a manner that will prevent entanglement during transit.

Note: See Part 15 (Rigging) for general requirements related to rigging.

26.95 Winches

A boat that is used to make up or strip booms must use a winch appropriate to the task that

(a) is capable of withstanding the maximum stress that could be imposed while moving log bundles, and

(b) has a large enough diameter to hold all of the line that is needed to complete the task.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.96 Manual boom stripping

If boom stripping is done manually, a sufficient number of workers must be available to handle the rigging safely.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.97 Portable augers

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

26.98 Dumping log bundles

A log or log bundle must not be dumped into water if there is a known or reasonably foreseeable risk to a worker.

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

26.99 Rescue

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

Table 26-1: Audible call signals

7 LONG whistles ACCIDENT
1 LONG whistle, continued until emergency condition has ceased to exist EMERGENCY HAZARD CONDITION
1 LONG — several SHORT whistles, repeated FIRE
1 LONG whistle (* also used by the equipment operator to indicate a delay and must also be given before the equipment is again operated) STARTING WHISTLE
4 LONG whistles CALLING SUPERVISOR
3 LONG whistles CALLING HOOKER
3 LONG — several SHORT whistles CALLING HOOKING CREW
2 LONG — 1 SHORT whistle CALLING SECOND RIGGER
2 LONG — several SHORT whistles CALLING SECOND RIGGER AND BACK RIGGERS
1 SHORT — 1 LONG whistle CALLING FOR WATER BAG
* When an operating delay has occurred and the equipment is ready to re-operate, the signal immediately following the "one LONG" re-start signal must be the repeat instruction signal.


Table 26-2: Audible signals for vehicle operations

1 whistle STOP
2 whistles BACK UP
3 whistles GO AHEAD

Table 26-3: Audible signals for high lead logging

3 SHORT AHEAD* ON MAINLINE
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT AHEAD ON STRAWLINE
2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT BACK* ON HAULBACK
2 SHORT — pause — series of SHORTS SLACK HAULBACK
Series of SHORTS SLACK MAINLINE
1 LONG (precedes any signal for slow operation) SLOW
1 SHORT STOP ALL LINES
3 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT TIGHTLINE
2 SHORT SLACK HAULBACK AND MAINLINE SIMULTANEOUSLY
3 SHORT — 1 SHORT WHEN BUTT RIGGING AT TREE SEND OUT STRAWLINE ON HAULBACK
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT of each extension WHEN BUTT RIGGING AT TREE SEND OUT STRAWLINE EXTENSIONS
2 SHORT — followed by a number of LONGS indicates the number of chokers required WHEN BUTT RIGGING IS AT TREE SEND OUT CHOKERS
2 LONG WHEN BUTT RIGGING IS AT TREE PUT ON/TAKE OFF SCAB BLOCK
5 SHORT WHEN BUTT RIGGING IS AT TREE INSPECT THE RIGGING
2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT TIGHTEN GUYLINE
2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT SLACK GUYLINE
* "AHEAD" means haulage line moves toward machine
* "BACK" means haulage line moves away from machine

Table 26-4: Audible signals for slackline logging

a) Regular Signals:
1 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT AHEAD ON SKYLINE
3 SHORT AHEAD ON SKIDDING LINE
2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT COME BACK ON HAULBACK
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT AHEAD ON STRAWLINE
3 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT TIGHTLINE
1 SHORT STOP
Several SHORT SLACK SKYLINE
3 SHORT — pause — several SHORT SLACK SKIDDING LINE
2 SHORT — pause — several SHORT SLACK HAULBACK
b) Slow Signals:
Any regular signal preceded by a LONG whistle is a slow signal. Any signal that the Engineer is not sure of is a "STOP" signal
c) Miscellaneous Signals:
3 SHORT — when carriage is going back HOLD SKIDDING LINE TIGHT AND KEEP ON COMING BACK UNTIL 'STOP' SIGNAL IS RECEIVED
2 SHORT — when carriage is going back HOLD SKIDDING LINE TIGHT, START LOWERING SKYLINE, KEEP ON COMING BACK
A REPEAT — 2 SHORT SLACK SKYLINE FASTER
2 SHORT — when carriage is going ahead PICK UP ON SKYLINE
TIGHTLINE SIGNAL (3 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT) when carriage is going ahead SKIDDING LINE IS WRAPPED AROUND SKYLINE
When carriage is going back and "STOP" signal (one SHORT) comes in — Engineer stops carriage and starts lowering skyline. If a slack skidding line signal (three SHORT — pause — several SHORT) comes in while lowering the skyline, it means slack skidding and skyline at same time so that chokers come straight down.
d) Signals to Chaser When Carriage is at Landing
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT SEND BACK STRAWLINE ON HAULBACK
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT followed by a number of evenly spaced SHORTS SEND BACK THAT NUMBER OF COILS OF STRAWLINE
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT – pause — 2 SHORT SEND BACK END OF STRAWLINE HOOKED INTO CHOKER BELL FOR A DEAD LINE
2 SHORT — pause — a number of evenly spaced LONGS SEND BACK THAT NUMBER OF CHOKERS
5 SHORT INSPECT BUTT RIGGING

Table 26-5: Audible signals for mechanical slack pulling and drop line carriages on skyline yarders or running skyline yarders (as applicable)

a) Regular Signals:
1 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT PICK UP SKYLINE
1 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT — pause — several SHORTS SLACK SKYLINE
2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT COME BACK ON HAULBACK
1 SHORT — (when carriage is stopped by hooker then the machine operator automatically lowers chokers to ground by winding in slackpuller and paying out skidding line) STOP ALL MOVING LINES
1 SHORT STOP PULLING SLACK
5 SHORT PULL SLACK AGAIN
1 SHORT — etc. STOP PULLING SLACK
2 SHORT (this means HOLD haulback — slack the slackpuller — wind in skidding line) PULL LOGS TO CARRIAGE
3 SHORT (this means wind in skidding line and slackpuller and pay out haulback) AHEAD ON SKIDDING LINE (use interlock if available)
2 SHORT — pause — several SHORTS SLACK HAULBACK
3 SHORT — pause — several SHORTS SLACK SKIDDING LINE
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT AHEAD ON STRAWLINE
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT — pause — several SHORTS SLACK STRAWLINE
1 SHORT — pause — several SHORTS SLACK SLACKPULLER
3 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT (line is wrapped around skyline) TIGHTLINE
b) Slow Signals:
Any regular signal preceded by a LONG whistle is a slow signal. Any signal the machine operator is not sure of is a "STOP" signal.
c) Miscellaneous Signals:
When carriage is going ahead to landing
2 SHORT STOP CARRIAGE AND PULL LOGS UP CLOSER TO CARRIAGE
Several quick SHORTS PICK UP SLACKPULLER FASTER
1 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT PICK UP SKYLINE
Signals to chaser when carriage is at landing
5 SHORT INSPECT THE RIGGING
2 SHORT — pause — 1 LONG for each choker SEND BACK THAT NUMBER OF CHOKERS
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT SEND OUT STRAWLINE ON HAULBACK
3 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT — pause — 1 SHORT for each extension SEND STRAWLINE EXTENSIONS (NOT COILS) ON HOOK
1 LONG — pause — 2 SHORT — pause — 2 SHORT SEND PREARRANGED MISCELLANEOUS RIGGING TO BACK-END ON HOOK (E.G. STRAWLINE COILS)

Table 26-6: Requirements for radio controlled carriages

— These carriages are fitted with and controlled by an onboard computerized radio control system. This radio system is operated independently through a transmitter separated from that of the yarder
— The yarding and carriage frequencies must be separate, registered and coordinated through the WCB co-ordination system to ensure that one does not interfere with the other or with another operation. Contact the WCB for more information.
— An audible signal must be sounded at the carriage and not at the yarder. This signal must have a tone different from that of the yarder signal.
— Standard skyline signals will apply at the yarder
a) Audible radio signals for hydraulic accumulator or motor driven slack pulling and dropline carriages with or without skyline lock
2 SHORT LOCK SKYLINE CLAMP
5 SHORT SLACK THE DROPLINE
1 SHORT STOP PULLING SLACK
5 SHORT, etc. PULL SLACK AGAIN
2 SHORT — pause — 1 LONG UNLOCK SKYLINE CLAMP
If fitted with engine controls
1 SHORT — pause — 1 LONG STOP ENGINE
1 LONG — pause — 1 SHORT START ENGINE
Carriages with variable dropline speeds must have a special signal for the speed changes. These signals must be different from standard yarding signals.
b) Audible radio signals for radio-controlled motorized self-contained yarding carriages with or without skyline locks
2 SHORT LOCK SKYLINE CLAMP
5 SHORT SLACK THE DROPLINE
1 SHORT STOP THE DROPLINE
3 SHORT PICK UP THE DROPLINE
2 SHORT — pause — 1 LONG UNLOCK SKYLINE CLAMP
If fitted with engine controls
1 SHORT — pause — 1 LONG STOP ENGINE
1 LONG — pause — 1 SHORT START ENGINE
Carriages with variable dropline speeds must have a special signal for the speed changes. These signals must be different from standard yarding signals.

Table 26-7: Hand signals
A Cable logging

Table 26-7:Hand signals for logging — Cable logging
Table 26-7:Hand signals for logging — Cable logging
Table 26-7:Hand signals for logging — Cable logging

Table 26-7: Hand signals (Continued)
A Cable logging (Continued)

Table 26-7: Hand signals for logging (Continued) — Cable logging

Table 26-7: Hand signals (Continued)
B Skidding

Table 26-7: Hand signals for logging (Continued) — Skidding
Table 26-7: Hand signals for logging (Continued) — Skidding

Table 26-8: Voice commands for grapple yarders

Item To instruct operator to: Signaller says:
1 Grapple log and go ahead CLOSE AND GO
2 Close grapple but not go ahead CLOSE
3 Stop rigging STOP
4 Open grapple OPEN
5 Move empty grapple ahead AHEAD
6 Move empty grapple back BACK
7 Go ahead on strawline AHEAD ON THE STRAWLINE
8 Slack mainline MAINLINE
9 Slack haulback HAULBACK
10 Lower grapple DOWN
11 Slack strawline SLACK STRAWLINE
12 Swing to operator's left SWING LEFT
13 Swing to operator's right SWING RIGHT
14 Hold haulback and go ahead on mainline TIGHTLINE

[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 20/2008, effective May 1, 2008.]

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Disclaimer: The Workers' Compensation Board of B.C. ("WorkSafeBC") publishes the online version Occupational Health and Safety Regulation ("OHS Regulation") in accordance with its mandate under the Workers Compensation Act to provide information and promote public awareness of occupational health and safety matters. The online OHS Regulation is not the official version of the OHS Regulation, which may be purchased from Crown Publications. WorkSafeBC endeavours to update the online OHS Regulation as soon as possible following any legislative amendments. However, WorkSafeBC does not warrant the accuracy or the completeness of the online OHS Regulation, and neither WorkSafeBC nor its board of directors, employees or agents shall be liable to any person for any loss or damage of any nature, whether arising out of negligence or otherwise, arising from the use of the online OHS Regulation. Employers are legally obligated to make a copy of the Workers Compensation Act and the OHS Regulation readily available for review by workers. The circumstances under which WorkSafeBC may consider an employer's providing access to electronic versions of the Act and OHS Regulation to have satisfied this obligation are described in Guideline G-D3-115(2)(f).